Camping mug

Best Camping Mugs for Backcountry Brews and Campsite Coffees

Camping mugs are such a seemly unimportant addition to your camping checklist. An extra that you can live without, right? Wrong! Though you’ll certainly survive without having a nice looking, insulating mug that feels great to hold and drink from, having one only makes the whole camping affair all the more enjoyable. At least I sure think so! It just doesn’t get much better than snuggling around a campfire with one of the best camping mugs you can get your mitted hands on, filled with your favourite drink.

So to make sure you don’t just ‘survive’ on your next camping or backpacking trip, we’ve put together a list of mugs that you won’t be able to resist. Plus, if you’re not sure what kind of mug makes it onto our list of the best camping mugs — and therefore what you should be thinking about when choosing one — take a read of our buyers guide at the bottom of the article.

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ProductConstructionCapacityInsulatedCost
Hydro Flask Coffee MugStainless steel350ml (12oz)Yes$$$
GSI Outdoors Infinity Backpacker MugPlastic500ml (17oz)Yes$
Yeti Rambler MugStainless steel400ml (14oz)Yes$$$
Snow Peak Double Wall 600 CupTitanium600ml (20oz)Yes$$$$
Sea To Summit X-CupSilicone250ml (8.3oz)No$
Hydro Flask Wine TumblerStainless steel295ml (10oz)Yes$$$
Zyliss Cafetiere MugPlastic350ml (12oz)Yes$$
United By Blue Buffalo Roam Compass CupStainless steel350ml (12oz)No$$
Huckberry Choose Your Own Adventure MugEnamel475ml (16oz)No$$

Best camping mugs

Hydro Flask Coffee Mug

Hydro Flask Coffee Mug

Eco-conscious: Made with recyclable materials
Weight: 318g (11.2oz)

With a slender lip that feels delicate to sip from, and a wonderfully soft-touch finish to wrap your cold hands around, this stainless steel camping mug is the closest thing you’ll get to the comfort of a regular mug. With double-wall vacuum insulation and a press-in lid, the Hydro Flask Coffee Mug will keep hot drinks hot for up to 6 hours (providing you keep that lid on!). It is the ideal mug for lazy mornings hanging out at camp, or long nights by the fire filled with something hot and strong! Plus, its 350ml (12oz) capacity makes it a good option if the Yeti Rambler is just that little too big.

Pros

  • Very good insulation
  • Well insulated lid
  • Feels good to hold and sip from

Cons

  • A little on the heavy side

Find the latest price at:
REI


GSI Outdoors Infinity Backpacker Mug

GSI Outdoors Infinity Backpacker Mug

Weight: 99g (3.5oz)

The GSI Outdoors Infinity Backpacker Mug is the lightest of the insulated backpacking mugs on our list. And with a huge 500ml (17oz) capacity, it is also one of the largest options, along with the Snow Peak Titanium Mug. This lightweight mug is ideal for taking out into the backcountry without compromising on good insulation. This is thanks to the removable ballistic-nylon-wrapped cozy that keeps its contents hot, and the collapsible tarpaulin handle to save weight and space. The main body is made from tough Polypropylene plastic that is BPA-free. Tt comes with a secure sippy lid that has a closable hole.

As if all that doesn’t make it one of the best backpacking mugs we’ve come across, then the highly appealing price tag sure seals the deal!

Pros

  • Great value
  • Very lightweight
  • Good sippy lid
  • Large capacity

Cons

  • Not as nice to drink from as metal or enamel mugs

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | REI | Backcountry


Yeti Rambler Mug

Yeti Rambler Mug

Weight: 369g (13oz)

You’ve probably heard people talk about them, or seen them mentioned in your favourite outdoor magazine. But really, what is a Yeti cup? And why are they so popular?! Well, if you’re after something that is, in Yeti’s words, the “toughest, most over-engineered camp mug out there” then maybe you’ll start to understand. The Yeti Rambler is rust- and puncture-resistant, made from stainless-steel, has double-wall vacuum insulation and has a wide opening. The bigger and arguably tougher cousin of the Hydroflask Camping Mug. It is also heavier and has a larger capacity (400ml / 14oz). Plus, holding a Yeti cup in your hands just makes you feel so darn outdoorsy.

Other than the weight and capacity, the other key difference to the Hydroflask is the transparent lid that makes taking that first sip less of a gamble on whether you’ll burn your lips or not! However, the lid is not insulated like the Hydro Flask options, letting down the overall insulating capabilities of this otherwise top-class camping mug.

Pros

  • Tough as nails
  • Feels good to hold and sip from
  • Comes with a sippy lid

Cons

  • Not a great insulator without its lid
  • Lid isn’t insulated

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | REI | Backcountry


Snow Peak Double Wall 600 Cup

Snow Peak Double Wall 600 Cup

Weight: 145g (5.1oz)

It’s lightweight, feels exceptionally decadent to drink out of, holds enough liquid to keep you hydrated for days, and is virtually bomb-proof. It also feels lovely to hold, and looks rather dashing, too! What’s not to love about this solid, double-wall vacuum insulated titanium camping mug? Well, the price. The Snow Peak Double Wall 600 Cup is most certainly not for the budget-conscious. But if you value long-lasting quality that will make every sip of your piping hot brew more enjoyable than the last (and have some extra cash at your disposal) then it is well worth the investment. The foldable handles make it highly packable and a superb option for lightweight backpacking.

It doesn’t come with a lid, which can be a negative for some.

Pros

  • Very large capacity — 600ml (20oz)
  • Good insulation
  • Lightweight
  • Highly durable
  • Looks and feels great

Cons

  • No lid

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | REI | Backcountry


Sea To Summit X-Cup

Sea To Summit X-Cup

Weight: 45g (1.6oz)

This collapsible silicone camping cup isn’t going to win any prizes for keeping hot drinks hot for hours on end. Nor is it likely to win the hearts of coffee sippers and tea steepers on the quest for the perfect vessel for their daily brew. However, weighing in at a featherweight 45g (1.6oz), and packing down to the size of chunky (½ inch) beer mat, the Sea To Summit X-Cup is one of the best backpacking mugs out there for minimalist hikers, travelers and backpackers. Complete with internal gradient markings to double as a measuring cup, and with a 250ml (8.3oz) capacity, the stiff silicone cup also packs inside the Sea To Summit X-Bowl to really keep things compact.

There is no lid, and you’ll have to get used to sipping small cups of Joe. But the smaller the volume, the less time it has to get cold, right?!

Pros

  • Ultra-lightweight
  • Collapsible
  • Highly packable

Cons

  • Small capacity
  • No insulation
  • No lid

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | REI | Backcountry


Hydro Flask Wine Tumbler

Hydro Flask Wine Tumbler

Eco-conscious: Made with recyclable materials
Weight: 176g (6.2oz)

If you’re after a camping mug that will satisfy the tastes of even the most ‘glampy’ of campers, then look no further than the oh-so-classy Hydro Flask Wine Tumbler. Though designed to slowly(?) sip your favourite vintage from whilst enjoying the luxury of fireside dining (at a proper camp table!), the Wine Tumbler is also a joy to drink coffee from. It feels elegant and refined on the lips (regardless of its contents), and sits so nicely in your hand(s) that you’ll not want to put it down! Like it’s more ‘campy’ cousin, the Hydro Flask Coffee Mug, it has double-wall vacuum insulation, is constructed of recyclable stainless-steel and comes with a press-in lid that provides excellent insulation.

There’s no handle, however, and you’ll have to keep your helpings of coffee, tea and wine down to 295ml (10oz).

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Feels wonderful to sip from and nice to hold
  • Very good insulation
  • Well insulated lid

Cons

  • No handle

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | REI | Backcountry


Zyliss Cafetiere Mug

Zyliss Cafetiere Mug

Weight: 200g (7oz)

For backpackers and lightweight campers who need that morning kick with minimal effort, the Zyliss Cafetiere Mug is up there with the best insulated coffee mugs. It features double-wall insulation that, combined with the press-in lid, keeps the heat in very efficiently. Great if you like piping hot coffee. Not so good if you’re in a rush to get on the trail! But the best part of this durable plastic 350ml (12oz) mug is that is comes with a French press coffee plunger. No filters needed. And certainly no need to bring along any complex coffee making equipment. Plus, it offers exceptional value.

The main downside is that the BPA-free plastic doesn’t feel that great to drink from compared with metal or enamel mugs. But if you’re not fussy about that then it’s a surefire winner for coffee drinkers.

Pros

  • Includes French press
  • Has lid with sipping hole
  • Good insulation

Cons

  • Mesh filter can become damaged easily (but Zyliss will replace this if needed)
  • Plastic not great to drink out of

Find the latest price on:
Amazon


United By Blue Buffalo Roam Compass Cup

United By Blue Buffalo Roam Compass Cup

Eco-conscious: For every product purchased United By Blue removes 1 pound of trash from the wilderness
Weight: 200g (7oz)

This United By Blue Buffalo Roam Compass Cup is another of our best camping mug options that wins the hearts of those who appreciate the finer things in life. Whilst it doesn’t make any wild claims of 24-hour heat retention or groundbreaking engineering, it does a very good job at keeping hot drinks hot and cold drinks cold. With folding handles, a 350ml (12oz) capacity, and made from lightweight 18/8 stainless steel, this practical and durable mug is also a bit of a looker! Plus, the wide opening makes it suitable for porridge, noodles and soup consumption, as well as liquid replenishment.

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Looks great
  • Wide opening
  • Folding handles

Cons

  • No lid
  • Average insulation

Find the latest price on:
Amazon | United by Blue | Backcountry


Huckberry Choose Your Own Adventure Mug

Huckberry Choose Your Own Adventure Enamel Camping Mug

It wouldn’t be a complete list of camp mugs without the inclusion of at least one enamel option. Enamel camping mugs may not be the best in terms of heat retention. And there’s always the danger of scolding your lips if you sip too soon! But nothing beats the way they feel to hold, filled with your favourite drink, when sitting round a campfire on a cold evening. Plus, you can always pop the mug directly on the fire to reheat its contents if you need. This Choose Your Own Adventure Mug from Huckberry can hold 475ml (16oz) of liquid, has a fun, camping-inspired design, and will last you for many, many years!

Not so keen on this design? No problem. Take a read of our enamel camping mugs article for some other classic designs.

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Looks great
  • Feels lovely to hold

Cons

  • No lid
  • Average insulation

Find the latest price at:
Huckberry


Important features of the best mugs for camping

Portability

The degree of portability you require from a camping mug largely depends upon the type of camping you are doing.

Car camping

Weight isn’t really that important, and nor is the size of your mug, really. But stackable mugs can be useful if you are camping in a group as mugs are not very space efficient. Sure, you’ve got a car to pile all your camping gear into, but space is still limited.

Backpacking

Low weight is key for those carrying all their gear out into the wilderness. And although some backpackers clip their mug onto the outside of their pack to save space, a mug that is collapsible and easily stored inside a pack is preferential to most trekkers.

Insulation

If you’re the sort of person who always has a hot drink in your hand, a camping mug with good insulation is key. As much as enamel camping mugs are highly appealing from a nostalgic and aesthetic point of view, they’re not very good at keeping in the heat. Camping mugs with double-wall vacuum insulation are the best at keeping hot drinks hot. And they do a very good job at keeping cold drinks cold, too.

Material

  • Plastic

    Plastic mugs are inexpensive and lightweight, and are generally pretty durable. However, they are not as nice to drink out of from a feel point of view as metal mugs. Plus, the plastic can make your drinks taste of whatever the mug last contained, or worse!

  • Stainless steel

    Most camping mugs are made out of stainless steel as it is highly durable, inexpensive and it does an OK job at not making your drinks taste of metal. This is arguable, and it really depends on how sensitive your taste buds are, as well as the quality of the metal.

  • Titanium

    Mugs constructed of titanium are mega lightweight, highly durable, feel awesome to drink from and tend not to taste of anything. They are also good insulators, like stainless steel. However, most titanium mugs cost a small fortune.

  • Enamel

    Wrapping your hands around an enamel camping mug filled with something hot and yummy just makes you feel great! They are an instagrammers dream, they feel nice to drink out of and they generally don’t take on any unwanted flavours. However, as they are single-walled, they don’t do a very good job at keeping drinks hot. Plus, their looks can degrade over time as the enamel chips off — though that kinda makes them even more appealing!

Handle

Whether your mug has a handle or not largely comes down to personal preference. That said, there are a couple of practical reasons why you may or may not want/need a handle on your camping mug.

No handle:

  • Space saving for backpackers
  • Easily stackable
  • Nicer to wrap your hands around!
  • Saves weight

Handle:

  • Easier to hold and sip from
  • Can be used to hook onto things for storage or transportation

Some mugs have foldable or fabric handles which addresses some of the above problems.

Lid

Aside from the extra weight (and washing up!), opting for a camping mug with a lid is almost always a positive thing. It helps to keep the heat in whilst you are carrying out other tasks. And it also helps to prevent spillages.

A few things to consider if you decide upon a mug with a lid:

  • Does it have a sip hole? If so, how easy/enjoyable is this to drink out of?
  • How secure is the lid once it’s on? If spillage prevention is more important than insulation then look for something secure, or even a screw top.

Capacity

The volume of liquid that your camping mug holds is something to consider. If you plan to use your mug for soups and cereal then consider a large volume mug. Mugs intended for guzzling cold drinks out of should also have a large volume (unless it’s ice cold vodka!). If, however, your camping mug will only ever be used to sip espresso from, well, keep it tiny!

Feel

This isn’t something that everyone can identify with. But for many people the feel of a mug is more important that one might realise. This is a two-fold thing: how it feels to hold in your hands, and how it feels on your lips when you sip from it. If you’re someone who makes a ritual out of that early morning coffee, or savours every sip of that well earned ice-cold beer, the feel of your mug can be of great importance.

Versatility

Finally, the best camp mugs are ones that aren’t too specific and can be used in many different scenarios. If you’re partial to car camping as much as wilderness camping then ideally your camping mug should be suited to both scenarios. The same goes for what you fill it with. It should good at keeping hot drinks hot and cold drinks cold. We’re really not asking much!


Yes, choosing the best camp mugs may be more involved than one could ever have imagined! But if you get the right one for your needs you’ll love every sip you take from it, with thanks that you took your sweet time to decide.

Happy guzzling, happy campers!

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About the author

author-joey

Joey Holmes is based in Cornwall, UK, and runs Cool of the Wild. She can’t get enough of being outdoors – whether that’s lounging around the campfire cooking up a feast, hitting the trail in her running shoes, or attempting to conquer the waves on her surfboard – she lives for it. Camping is what she loves to do the most, but has also spent many many hours clinging to the side of a rock face, cycling about the place, cruising the ski-slopes on her snowboard and hiking small mountains and big hills.

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